The Well Workplace

More changes to the electronic recordkeeping rule eyed by OSHA

Posted by Deborah Lechner
Jul 26, 2017 11:41:31 AM

When the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) passed down the final rule that would eventually require employers to electronically submit all of their employee injury and illness data, it garnered a lot of attention. We discussed the rule and its potential impact and implications in depth last year. Since then, OSHA has proposed that the original start date of July 1, 2017, be delayed until December 1, 2017. Additionally, the rule has faced legal troubles of its own. For now, OSHA says it will launch its web-based form, the Injury Tracking Application (ITA), on Aug. 1, 2017. The ITA will allow employers to electronically submit required injury and illness data from their completed 2016 OSHA Form 300A.

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Hit pause on recordables with a worksite prevention program

Posted by Deborah Lechner
Jun 22, 2017 11:48:46 AM

Although the new recordkeeping requirements for workplace injury and illness set forth by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) have been delayed until further notice, keeping a close eye on workplace injuries means employers will be ready when the changes take effect.

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Risky business: the hidden costs of workplace injury

Posted by Deborah Lechner
May 24, 2017 10:58:49 AM

If your business hires workers for physically demanding jobs – and if your business is manufacturing, warehousing or transportation, you probably do – reducing the risk and expense of workplace injuries is a priority you can’t afford to ignore. And while accidents are sure to happen, 63 percent of the top ten workplace injuries identified by Liberty Mutual Research Institute are exactly the kinds of mishaps that pre-hire Physical Abilities Testing (PAT) is designed to help prevent.

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Three cost-saving benefits of worksite physical therapy

Posted by Deborah Lechner
Apr 27, 2017 4:21:26 PM

As the opioid epidemic continues to widen in the United States, it’s important to recognize there are steps employers can take to help curb new cases. In a recent blog we discuss how addressing the underlying cause of pain or injury with first aid and physical therapy, rather than simply treating the symptoms with opioids, is not only a more effective treatment method for the injured worker, it’s also one that avoids the considerable risks associated with their use.

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Physical therapy as an alternative to opioids in treating musculoskeletal injuries

Posted by Deborah Lechner
Mar 15, 2017 1:54:41 PM

The use of opioid painkillers has skyrocketed to epidemic levels in the United States in recent years. According to the Centers for Disease Control, there were enough opioid painkillers prescribed in 2012 for every American to have their own bottle (almost 260 million prescriptions). Opioids are highly addictive, and taking them can lead to dependence and overdose, which is now the primary cause of accidental death in the U.S.

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Slips, trips and falls prevention with pre-hire testing can trump any new regulation

Posted by Deborah Lechner
Feb 14, 2017 1:44:51 PM

In November 2016, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule updating Walking-Working Surfaces standards, with a focus on slips, trips and falls hazards. The rule, which OSHA estimates will prevent 29 fatalities and more than 5,842 injuries annually, is not expected to become a target of President Donald Trump and the Republican Congress as part of their pledge to “eliminate unnecessary regulations,” according to industry experts.

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New OSHA Regulations for 2017: What do they really mean for employers?

Posted by Deborah Lechner
Jan 17, 2017 11:28:46 AM

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued several new regulations in the last months of 2016, set to go into effect in January 2017. Since they were announced, the regulations have been subject to more than a little misinterpretation and confusion. Many employers are left wondering, for example, if they can still drug test employees who are injured on the job (they can). We share the following information, of course, with the understanding that the incoming Trump administration’s staunch anti-regulation stance may change things after the inauguration.

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Physical Abilities Testing: How it can help or hurt your company’s reputation

Posted by Deborah Lechner
Dec 14, 2016 3:53:12 PM

Recently, we have been looking at how Physical Abilities Tests can help mitigate compliance, operational and financial risk. In this post, we’ll address the ways that Physical Abilities Testing can affect an organization’s reputation

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Minimize costly work-related injuries and mitigate financial risk with one easy step

Posted by Deborah Lechner
Dec 7, 2016 2:51:43 PM

The bottom line is ultimately one of the most important things a business organization considers with every decision. As such, risky financial moves are often avoided. If your organization requires a labor force capable of physically demanding work, there is an easy way to mitigate financial risk: the implementation of Physical Abilities Testing.

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Preventing operational risk with Physical Abilities Testing

Posted by Deborah Lechner
Nov 30, 2016 11:23:52 AM

The implementation of a pre-hire Physical Abilities Test (PAT) offers an employer many benefits, but when it comes to mitigating operational and productivity risk, a PAT is especially beneficial. We have previously explained how to mitigate compliance risk when implementing PAT. While avoiding all forms of risk is preferred, preventing operational risk is an immediate benefit of a proper PAT.

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